Role of chemistry and its relationship with other sciences

What is the Relationship of Chemistry with Other Sciences? | Life Persona

role of chemistry and its relationship with other sciences

In Africa we believe chemistry explains witchcraft or which other As the earth originated chemistry also began to play its important role in this world. Chemistry plays a central role in science and is often entwined with other. Contribution of Chemistry to Other Sciences - Free download as Word Doc .doc / .docx), Usin chemistry we can evaluate the nutririon content of our food as well as its energy . What is the Role of Energy in the Development of Human Society From Industrial What is the Relationship of Proverbs in Philippine Culture. Chemistry relates to other sciences in many topics. In physics, when you do Radioactivity, you need to know atomic structures(Chemistry topic).

Among its links are physics, mathematics, biochemistry and astronomy, among others. Initially, all the studies that had to do with the environment that surrounds us was known as natural sciences. The relation of these matters allows us to explain the complex phenomena that happen in nature. With the specialization of the fields, these were specializing and acquiring the name of science themselves. The first four major fields of natural sciences to specialize were the physicalthe chemistrythe biology and the geology.

With the passage of time the studies of each of the sciences were delimited and new sciences appeared that were more specialized like biochemistry, biophysics, geochemistry, etc. The greatest relationship of chemistry is with physics. The interaction between them was very important in the development of atomic theory. The rules of materials found in nature were explained by quantum mechanics, so theoretical chemistry really is theoretical physics.

You may be interested The Importance of Chemistry: Chemistry Branches This branch of chemistry studies the relationships of compounds that are based on carbon chains. Inorganic chemistry This branch of science studies the properties of elements that are not composed of carbon chains. Among them are the electrical and magnetic properties of atoms. Biochemistry Study the chemical relationships of living things. If we wished to manufacture a particular protein, we would give these instructions: In this way, we will get a complicated-looking chain, hooked together and having some complex structure; this is presumably just the manner in which all the various enzymes are made.

One of the great triumphs in recent times sincewas at last to discover the exact spatial atomic arrangement of certain proteins, which involve some fifty-six or sixty amino acids in a row. Over a thousand atoms more nearly two thousand, if we count the hydrogen atoms have been located in a complex pattern in two proteins.

The first was hemoglobin. One of the sad aspects of this discovery is that we cannot see anything from the pattern; we do not understand why it works the way it does. Of course, that is the next problem to be attacked. Another problem is how do the enzymes know what to be? A red-eyed fly makes a red-eyed fly baby, and so the information for the whole pattern of enzymes to make red pigment must be passed from one fly to the next.

This is done by a substance in the nucleus of the cell, not a protein, called DNA short for desoxyribose nucleic acid. This is the key substance which is passed from one cell to another for instance sperm cells consist mostly of DNA and carries the information as to how to make the enzymes.

First, the blueprint must be able to reproduce itself. Secondly, it must be able to instruct the protein. Concerning the reproduction, we might think that this proceeds like cell reproduction. Cells simply grow bigger and then divide in half. Must it be thus with DNA molecules, then, that they too grow bigger and divide in half?

Every atom certainly does not grow bigger and divide in half!

How does chemistry relate to other sciences? | Socratic

No, it is impossible to reproduce a molecule except by some more clever way. Schematic diagram of DNA. The structure of the substance DNA was studied for a long time, first chemically to find the composition, and then with x-rays to find the pattern in space. The result was the following remarkable discovery: The DNA molecule is a pair of chains, twisted upon each other. The backbone of each of these chains, which are analogous to the chains of proteins but chemically quite different, is a series of sugar and phosphate groups, as shown in Fig.

Thus perhaps, in some way, the specific instructions for the manufacture of proteins are contained in the specific series of the DNA. Attached to each sugar along the line, and linking the two chains together, are certain pairs of cross-links. Whatever the letters may be in one chain, each one must have its specific complementary letter on the other chain.

What then about reproduction? Suppose we split this chain in two. How can we make another one just like it?

The Scientific Method & its Importance - Studi Chemistry

This is the central unsolved problem in biology today. The first clues, or pieces of information, however, are these: There are in the cell tiny particles called ribosomes, and it is now known that that is the place where proteins are made.

But the ribosomes are not in the nucleus, where the DNA and its instructions are. Something seems to be the matter. However, it is also known that little molecule pieces come off the DNA—not as long as the big DNA molecule that carries all the information itself, but like a small section of it.

This is called RNA, but that is not essential. It is a kind of copy of the DNA, a short copy. The RNA, which somehow carries a message as to what kind of protein to make goes over to the ribosome; that is known. When it gets there, protein is synthesized at the ribosome. That is also known. However, the details of how the amino acids come in and are arranged in accordance with a code that is on the RNA are, as yet, still unknown.

We do not know how to read it. Certainly no subject or field is making more progress on so many fronts at the present moment, than biology, and if we were to name the most powerful assumption of all, which leads one on and on in an attempt to understand life, it is that all things are made of atoms, and that everything that living things do can be understood in terms of the jigglings and wigglings of atoms.

Astronomy is older than physics. In fact, it got physics started by showing the beautiful simplicity of the motion of the stars and planets, the understanding of which was the beginning of physics. But the most remarkable discovery in all of astronomy is that the stars are made of atoms of the same kind as those on the earth. Atoms liberate light which has definite frequencies, something like the timbre of a musical instrument, which has definite pitches or frequencies of sound.

When we are listening to several different tones we can tell them apart, but when we look with our eyes at a mixture of colors we cannot tell the parts from which it was made, because the eye is nowhere near as discerning as the ear in this connection. However, with a spectroscope we can analyze the frequencies of the light waves and in this way we can see the very tunes of the atoms that are in the different stars.

As a matter of fact, two of the chemical elements were discovered on a star before they were discovered on the earth. Helium was discovered on the sun, whence its name, and technetium was discovered in certain cool stars. This, of course, permits us to make headway in understanding the stars, because they are made of the same kinds of atoms which are on the earth.

Now we know a great deal about the atoms, especially concerning their behavior under conditions of high temperature but not very great density, so that we can analyze by statistical mechanics the behavior of the stellar substance. Even though we cannot reproduce the conditions on the earth, using the basic physical laws we often can tell precisely, or very closely, what will happen. So it is that physics aids astronomy. Strange as it may seem, we understand the distribution of matter in the interior of the sun far better than we understand the interior of the earth.

What goes on inside a star is better understood than one might guess from the difficulty of having to look at a little dot of light through a telescope, because we can calculate what the atoms in the stars should do in most circumstances. One of the most impressive discoveries was the origin of the energy of the stars, that makes them continue to burn. One of the men who discovered this was out with his girlfriend the night after he realized that nuclear reactions must be going on in the stars in order to make them shine.

She was not impressed with being out with the only man who, at that moment, knew why stars shine. Well, it is sad to be alone, but that is the way it is in this world. Furthermore, ultimately, the manufacture of various chemical elements proceeds in the centers of the stars, from hydrogen. How do we know? Because there is a clue. The proportions are purely the result of nuclear reactions.

What is the Relationship of Chemistry with Other Sciences?

By looking at the proportions of the isotopes in the cold, dead ember which we are, we can discover what the furnace was like in which the stuff of which we are made was formed. Astronomy is so close to physics that we shall study many astronomical things as we go along. First, meteorology and the weather. Of course the instruments of meteorology are physical instruments, and the development of experimental physics made these instruments possible, as was explained before.

However, the theory of meteorology has never been satisfactorily worked out by the physicist. It turns out to be very sensitive, and even unstable. If you have ever seen water run smoothly over a dam, and then turn into a large number of blobs and drops as it falls, you will understand what I mean by unstable. You know the condition of the water before it goes over the spillway; it is perfectly smooth; but the moment it begins to fall, where do the drops begin? What determines how big the lumps are going to be and where they will be?

role of chemistry and its relationship with other sciences

That is not known, because the water is unstable. Even a smooth moving mass of air, in going over a mountain turns into complex whirlpools and eddies. In many fields we find this situation of turbulent flow that we cannot analyze today. Quickly we leave the subject of weather, and discuss geology! The question basic to geology is, what makes the earth the way it is?

The most obvious processes are in front of your very eyes, the erosion processes of the rivers, the winds, etc. It is easy enough to understand these, but for every bit of erosion there is an equal amount of something else going on. Mountains are no lower today, on the average, than they were in the past.

There must be mountain-forming processes. You will find, if you study geology, that there are mountain-forming processes and volcanism, which nobody understands but which is half of geology. The phenomenon of volcanoes is really not understood. What makes an earthquake is, ultimately, not understood. It is understood that if something is pushing something else, it snaps and will slide—that is all right. But what pushes, and why?

The theory is that there are currents inside the earth—circulating currents, due to the difference in temperature inside and outside—which, in their motion, push the surface slightly. Thus if there are two opposite circulations next to each other, the matter will collect in the region where they meet and make belts of mountains which are in unhappy stressed conditions, and so produce volcanoes and earthquakes.

What about the inside of the earth? A great deal is known about the speed of earthquake waves through the earth and the density of distribution of the earth. However, physicists have been unable to get a good theory as to how dense a substance should be at the pressures that would be expected at the center of the earth. Agricultural chemistry Agricultural chemistry is concerned with the substances and chemical reactions that are involved with the production, protection and use of crops and livestock.

It is a highly interdisciplinary field that relies on ties to many other sciences. Agricultural chemists develop fertilizers, insecticides and herbicides necessary for large-scale crop production. They must also monitor how these products are used and their impacts on the environment. Nutritional supplements are developed to increase the productivity of meat and dairy herds.

Agricultural biotechnology is a fast-growing focus for many agricultural chemists.

How does chemistry relate to other sciences?

Genetically manipulating crops to be resistant to the herbicides used to control weeds in the fields requires detailed understanding of both the plants and the chemicals at the molecular level. Biochemists must understand genetics, chemistry and business needs to develop crops that are easier to transport or that have a longer shelf life.

Chemical engineering Chemical engineers research and develop new materials or processes that involve chemical reactions. Chemical engineering combines a background in chemistry with engineering and economics concepts to solve technological problems. Chemical engineering jobs fall into two main groups: Industries require chemical engineers to devise new ways to make the manufacturing of their products easier and more cost effective. Chemical engineers are involved in designing and operating processing plants, develop safety procedures for handling dangerous materials, and supervise the manufacture of nearly every product we use.

role of chemistry and its relationship with other sciences

Chemical engineers work to develop new products and processes in every field from pharmaceuticals to fuels and computer components. Geochemistry Geochemists combine chemistry and geology to study the makeup and interaction between substances found in the Earth.

Geochemists may spend more time in field studies than other types of chemists. Many work for the U. Geological Survey or the Environmental Protection Agency in determining how mining operations and waste can affect water quality and the environment.

They may travel to remote abandoned mines to collect samples and perform rough field evaluations, and then follow a stream through its watershed to evaluate how contaminants are moving through the system. Petroleum geochemists are employed by oil and gas companies to help find new energy reserves.

The Feynman Lectures on Physics Vol. I Ch. 3: The Relation of Physics to Other Sciences

They may also work on pipelines and oil rigs to prevent chemical reactions that could cause explosions or spills. Forensic chemistry Forensic chemists capture and analyze the physical evidence left behind at a crime scene to help determine the identities of the people involved as well as to answer other vital questions regarding how and why the crime was carried out. Forensic chemists use a wide variety of analyzation methods, such as chromatography, spectrometry and spectroscopy. In new research appearing in the Journal of the American Society of Mass Spectrometry, scientists from the department of chemistry at Louisiana State University LSU set out to apply laser technology to the field of forensic science.