Teacher and student relationship in class

teacher and student relationship in class

As a classroom teacher, you wield a great deal of power over your students simply He goes on to assert that relationships are perhaps more important at the. Teachers with strong teacher student relationships have more impact on their relationship with your students, they are more likely feel positive about class and . Students who have positive relationships with their teachers use them as a secure base from which they can explore the classroom and school setting both.

As mentioned earlier, students with high self-esteem are more likely to be self-efficacious and set higher goals Ryan et al. Students with high self-esteem are more likely to have positive relationships with peers as well as with adults Orth et al. Self-esteem is especially important during adolescence and helps students develop a positive sense of self Orth et al.

Developing Positive Teacher-Student Relations

A positive sense of self in adolescence leads to future outcomes including relationship satisfaction, job satisfaction, occupational status, emotional regulation, and physical health Orth et al. The support of positive teacher-student relationships for self-esteem and related social outcomes affects students during schooling as well as in their future educational and occupational outcomes Orth et al.

teacher and student relationship in class

Conclusion and Limitations Although there is extensive research on the positive effects of teacher-student relationships on elementary school students, there is little research on middle and high school students. Middle and high school is when students begin to think about their academic futures, which are informed by academic achievement and social capital in elementary years Alexander et al.

Early high school is usually when students dedicate themselves to graduating or decide to drop out Henry et al. Currently, high school dropout rates are high, and improving teacher-student relationships for students at this stage may decrease dropout rates Henry et al.

teacher and student relationship in class

Similarly, high school is when students decide if they plan to attend college or stop their education Alexander et al. Therefore, it is important to develop positive teacher-student relationships during this time.

Empirical evidence does show that teacher-student relationships are very important for high school students Alexander et al.

However, much of this research is dated. Due to the ever-changing nature of the American educational system and the increasingly diverse student body, more current studies are needed to look at the effects of teacher-student relationships for this changing population.

Conducting research on the relationship between high school students and teachers may be essential in improving the outcomes of low-income middle and high school students, and can potentially inform future interventions to help older students perform better both academically and socially.

From first grade forward: Early foundations of high school dropout. Sociology of Education, The teacher—student relationship as a developmental context for children with internalizing or externalizing behavior problems. School Psychology Quarterly, 23 1 The exercise of control. Attachment and loss, Vol.

teacher and student relationship in class

The ecology of developmental processes. The ecology of human development: Experiments by nature and design. High school dropout and completion rates in the United States: Social capital and dropping out of high school: The Teachers College Record, 4 Applications of social capital in educational literature: Steps to Use When Correcting Students Review what happened Identify and accept the student's feelings Review alternative actions Explain the building policy as it applies to the situation Let the student know that all students are treated the same Invoke an immediate and meaningful consequence Let the student know you are disappointed that you have to invoke a consequence to his or her action Communicate an expectation that the student will do better in the future Imagine that Johnny hit Sam because Sam called his mother a name.

The importance of positive teacher-student relationships in classrooms - The Educator Blog

This is how you could put these disciplinary steps in place: Discuss the incident with Johnny. Begin with fact finding to be sure that you are appropriately correcting the student.

teacher and student relationship in class

The worst way to affect teacher-student relationships is to unfairly discipline a student. Identify and accept the student's feelings. Tell Johnny that you understand why it upset him to hear somebody call his mother a name and that you, too, would be upset if someone maligned your mother.

It's important to understand that this step communicates that you respect and understand his feelings but that you are not accepting his actions. Go over with Johnny the different actions he could have taken, such as ignoring the remark or reporting it to a teacher.

Explain the building policy as it applies to the situation. Remind Johnny of the building policy of not fighting and that the rule is if anyone hits another student, he or she will be sent to the office and possibly be suspended from school. Let the student know that all students are treated the same.

Make sure that Johnny understands that all students must adhere to the policy and that any student who disregards the rule will suffer the consequences. Invoke an immediate and meaningful consequence. Communicate with the office about what happened and send Johnny to the office. Let the student know you are disappointed that you have to invoke a consequence to his or her action.

Tell Johnny that you are disappointed that his actions have led to this situation. Communicate an expectation that the student will do better in the future. Remind Johnny that, although you do not approve of his actions and do not like to send him or any student to the office, you like him and know that he will make a better choice next time.

Also tell him that you are there to support him and work through these issues with him in the future. In addition to your following these steps when correcting a student, it is important to keep some key philosophical precepts in mind. First of all, remember to correct the student in a private location.

Although it is not always possible to remove a student from the classroom, do your best to prevent visual access by other students as you discipline. Public correction can foster feelings of anger, embarrassment, and bitterness; it can also become a sideshow for the other students. Finally, remember to stay calm and avoid frustration. The worst thing you can do is to invoke a consequence when you are angry or upset, as this can lead to regrettable actions on your part.

The importance of positive teacher-student relationships in classrooms

Key Philosophical Precepts When Correcting Students Correct in a private location Treat students as you want your own children treated Stay calm Avoid frustration It is also important to follow certain steps after disciplining a student.

These steps are shown in Figure 1. Steps to Follow After Disciplining a Student Touch base with the student Acknowledge postdisciplinary successes Don't give up too quickly Let's go back to the example of Johnny, in which he earned an office referral because he hit Sam.

Here are some actions you could take: But I have noticed, just as the research shows, that when I can build ties with a student, especially one who is struggling with academics or behavior, that child seems to work harder and becomes more willing to take risks and challenges in the classroom that benefit learning.

Each morning my students line up in the hall outside my classroom door and before they enter, I say good morning to each student by name, and they choose from either a hug, handshake, or high-five greeting.

teacher and student relationship in class

Everyone, including me, starts the day by entering the room with a big smile. At the end of the day, I stand at the classroom door as students pass by allowing me to say good-bye to each person, perhaps commenting on the great day they had, and wishing them a good evening. Student Letters and Questionnaires The first week of school I ask my students to write me a letter that tells me everything I need to know about them.

I love when the letters come in and I learn about siblings, pets, hobbies, and some of their feelings toward school. It also gives me ideas for starting discussions with the students.

For example, I built an instant bond with my fledgling fashion designer this year when I told her that I used to fill notebooks with fashion designs when I was her age I really did! Velociraptor out of a shrink-wrapped set and handed it to him. Another way to find out more about your students is with written questionnaires or interviews.

  • Chapter 1. Developing Positive Teacher-Student Relations
  • 10 Ways to Build Relationships With Students This Year

Forms such as the one shown below are a quick way to get to know your students. Parent Input Helps No one knows their children better than their parents, so at the start of each school year, I ask them to send me a short note about their children to provide insights that will help me create an individualized program that best suits their child.

When I first began doing this years ago, I thought parents would give me the rose-colored glasses version of their children. These notes serve a higher purpose than letting me get to know the students. They focus my head and heart on the fact that these parents are entrusting me for the next 40 weeks to teach and look after a child they love with all their heart.

Sports is always a great common denominator.